'Is my life worth less than someone else's?': Footballer slams UEFA

‘Is my life worth less than someone else’s?’: Lesbian Swedish captain of Chelsea’s women’s football team slams UEFA for banning rainbow display ahead of Euro 2020 matches

  • Magdalena Eriksson, 27, has spoken out over UEFA’s refusal to support gay pride
  • UEFA barred a stadium from lighting up in rainbow colours for a Euros match
  • Decision led to stadia across Germany lighting up as their side played Hungary
  • Eriksson said it made her question her value to UEFA as an openly gay player 

Chelsea captain Magdalena Eriksson has slammed UEFA for banning rainbow displays at Euro 2020 matches. 

Writing in The Athletic, Eriksson, 27, described the decision as ‘scary’ and said it made her question the value the football association puts on her life as an openly gay player. 

‘Does this mean that my life is worth less than someone else’s? Than someone who is living the norm, living a different lifestyle?’, she wrote. 

Eriksson blasted UEFA’s continued refusal to allow rainbow flags at some matches after they were again banned for two quarter finals and officials appeared to confiscate a rainbow flag from a Denmark supporter in Baku. 

German officials were banned from lighting up Munich’s Allianz Arena with rainbow colours for the Euros tie with Hungary over ‘political context’ after Viktor Orban’s government passed new anti-LGBT laws.  

The Swedish footballer is in a relationship with Chelsea team-mate and Denmark star Pernille Harder, 28, and the couple live together in London.    

Chelsea star Magdalena Eriksson (right, with girlfriend Pernille Harder) has spoken out over UEFA’s refusal to light up a stadium in Munich with rainbow colours for Germany’s Euros 2020 clash with Hungary

The couple shot to fame when they were pictured sharing a kiss as Eriksson celebrated Sweden beating Canada in a last 16 match in the Women’s World Cup in France in 2019

She said the issue of gay pride flags and illuminations at football matches is not a political question, but one of human rights.

Describing football as a force to push for diversity, equality, and anti-discrimination, Eriksson explained that only seven or eight years ago you would never have been a rainbow flag at a game. 

But in a dig at UEFA she said it is ‘obvious’ football still has a long way to go to be a safe space for LGBTQ+ people. 

‘Hopefully, football will one day become an environment where a male player feels comfortable enough to come out and tell the world that he is gay… that moment is clearly not now.’

Eriksson said the issue of gay pride flags and illuminations at football matches is not a political question, but one of human rights (pictured, during a FA Women’s Super League match on March 28)

Eriksson said the issue of gay pride flags and illuminations at football matches is not a political question, but one of human rights (Pictured, Olympiastadion in Berlin, Germany lit up in protest during the national team’s clash with Hungary)

She also hit out at claims footballers should stay quiet on political issues, explaining her role as ‘helping to form young children’s views on right and wrong.’

She cited Marcus Rashford’s work encouraging the British government to provide free school meals throughout school holidays, and Romelu Lukaku and Raheem Sterling speaking out against racism. 

‘For millions of kids following footballers all over the world, how we act and what we say matters deeply to them’, she wrote.   

‘Even if I don’t change anything on a big political stage, the possibility of making one person’s life a little bit easier means that being an activist is 100 per cent worth it. 

‘I know how much it means to our fans that Pernille and I are open about our sexuality, showing the world that our relationship is normal and should be accepted.’

Eriksson and Pernille, who won the FA Women’s Super League together this season, went viral when they were pictured sharing a kiss as Eriksson celebrated Sweden beating Canada in a last 16 match in the Women’s World Cup in France in 2019.

The couple, who are known for their LGBT+ advocacy, have been together since 2014 when the met playing together for Linköpings in Sweden.  

Eriksson and Pernille, who won the FA Women’s Super League together this season (pictured, centre), are known for their LGBTQ+ advocacy

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