Myanmar security forces shoot dead more than 90 protestors

Five-year-old boy is murdered in Myanmar military junta’s massacre: One hundred and six pro-democracy protesters dead after troops open fire on march – after warning demonstrators ‘we’ll shoot you in the head’

  • More than 106 protestors, including a boy, five, have been shot and killed by Myanmar security forces today 
  • Took to streets in Yangon, Mandalay and other towns, defying warning they could be shot in ‘head and back’
  • Has been branded ‘day of shame’ as the deaths marks on of the bloodiest days since the coup began
  • WARNING: GRAPHIC IMAGES 

Myanmar’s military junta massacred a five-year-old boy and more than 100 protestors as troops opened fire on pro-democracy protestors.

It comes after state television warned demonstrators they were ‘in danger of getting shot to the head and back’ on Friday. 

Protesters against the February 1 military coup came out on the streets of Yangon, Mandalay and other towns, defying they warning that they could be shot, while the country’s generals celebrated Armed Forces Day.

The deaths on Saturday, one of the bloodiest days since the coup, takes the number of civilians reported killed to nearly 400. Tens of thousands of people demonstrated in parts of Myanmar today.

A boy reported by local media to be as young as five was among at least 13 people killed in Myanmar’s second city of Mandalay. 

A wounded protester is seen after security forces intervene in protesters during a protest against military coup and detention of elected government members in Mandalay, Myanmar

More than 60 protestors are believed to have been killed by Myanmar security forces today. Pictured: Anti-coup protesters extinguish fires during a protest in Thaketa township Yangon, Myanmar

Protesters against the February 1 military coup came out on the streets of Yangon, Mandalay and other towns, defying a warning that they could be shot ‘in the head and back’. Pictured: aAman displaying spent cartridges as security forces opened fire during a demonstration


The latest violence against the protestors has been branded a ‘day of shame’ Pictured: Protesters carry an injured man to safety in Kawthoung, Myanmar, (left) and smoke rises from what appears to be a burning vehicle during the protest against military coup

Family members were seen crying in front of a man after he was shot dead during an anti-coup protesters crackdown in Yangon, Myanmar

The deaths on Saturday, one of the bloodiest days since the coup, takes the number of civilians reported killed to nearly 400. Pictured: A protester shows a bullet during a protest against military coup

‘Today is a day of shame for the armed forces,’ Dr. Sasa, a spokesman for CRPH, an anti-junta group set up by deposed lawmakers, told an online forum. 

The Myanmar Now news portal said 64 people had been killed in total across the country by 2.30pm local time and the total is now believed to have risen to 106.

Three people, including a man who plays in a local under-21 football team, were killed in a protest in the Insein district of Myanmar’s biggest city Yangon, a neighbour said.

‘They are killing us like birds or chickens, even in our homes,’ said Thu Ya Zaw in the central town of Myingyan, where at least two protesters were killed. ‘We will keep protesting regardless… We must fight until the junta falls.’

Deaths were reported from the central Sagaing region, Lashio in the east, in the Bago region, near Yangon, and elsewhere. A one year-old baby was hit in the eye with a rubber bullet.

In response to the latest killings, the UK Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab tweeted: ‘Today’s killing of unarmed civilians, including children, marks a new low. 

Tens of thousands of people demonstrated in parts of Myanmar today. Pictured: Wounded hand of a protester is seen after security forces intervene in protesters during a protest in Mandalay

One of Myanmar’s two dozen ethnic armed groups, the Karen National Union, said it had overrun an army post near the Thai border, killing 10 people. Pictured: Bullet holes are seen on the window at American Center Yangon (ACY) in Yangon, Myanmar

A military spokesman did not respond to calls seeking comment on the killings by security forces. Pictured: Protesters holding homemade shields during a demonstration against the military coup in Dawei


A security officer was seen appearing to kick a man who was lying on the street in Sanchaung, Yangon, Myanmar, today

The warning did not specifically say security forces had been given shoot-to-kill orders and the junta has previously suggested some fatal shootings have come from within the crowds. Pictured: Protesters make Molotov cocktails during a rally against the military coup in Yangon, Myanmar

Protestors make a makeshift slingshot using a hard hat  in order to launch rocks during the rally in Yangon, Myanmar

To take on the police, a group of protestors in Thaketa township Yangon, Myanmar, made makeshift bow and arrows

As well as wearing protective gear, the protestors in Thaketa township Yangon, Myanmar, armed themselves with makeshift airguns to confront police

Anti-coup protesters prepare with makeshift airgun during police crackdown at Thaketa township in Yangon, Myanmar

‘We will work with our international partners to end this senseless violence, hold those responsible to account, and secure a path back to democracy.’

Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab branded the latest killings ‘senseless’ on Twitter this afternoon

British Ambassador Dan Chugg said: ‘On Myanmar’s Armed Forces Day, the security forces have disgraced themselves by shooting unarmed civilians. Dozens of innocent people have reportedly been killed, including children. 

‘At a time of economic crisis, Covid, and a worsening humanitarian situation, today’s military parade and extrajudicial killings speak volumes for the priorities of the military junta.’ 

Meanwhile, one of Myanmar’s two dozen ethnic armed groups, the Karen National Union, said it had overrun an army post near the Thai border, killing 10 people – including a lieutenant colonel – and losing one of its own fighters.

Myanmar’s ethnic armed factions will not stand by and allow more killings, the leader of one of the main armed groups said on Saturday.

A military spokesman did not respond to calls seeking comment on the killings by security forces or the insurgent attack on its post.

After presiding over a military parade in the capital Naypyitaw to mark Armed Forces Day, Senior General Min Aung Hlaing reiterated a promise to hold elections after overthrowing elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi, without giving any time-frame. 

‘The army seeks to join hands with the entire nation to safeguard democracy,’ the general said in a live broadcast on state television, adding that authorities also sought to protect the people and restore peace across the country.

‘Violent acts that affect stability and security in order to make demands are inappropriate.’ 

Large groups of protestors, wearing face masks, hard hats and some wearing protective goggles, took to the streets in Mandalay, Myanmar

Several protestors at the march in Mandalay, Myanmar, were also seen wearing protective vests and other head gear

In a warning on Friday evening, state television said protesters were ‘in danger of getting shot to the head and back’. Pictured: An anti-coup protester throws a smoke bomb against police crackdown in Thaketa township

Protestors set up makeshift barricades to deter security forces during a demonstration against the military coup in Yangon’s Hlaing township

Deaths were reported from the central Sagaing region, Lashio in the east, in the Bago region, near Yangon, and elsewhere. Pictured: A man stands behind a barricade during a protest against the military coup, in Yangon, Myanmar

In a warning on Friday evening, state television said protesters were ‘in danger of getting shot to the head and back’. 

The warning did not specifically say security forces had been given shoot-to-kill orders and the junta has previously suggested some fatal shootings have come from within the crowds.

But it showed the military’s determination to prevent any disruptions around Armed Forces Day, which commemorates the start of the resistance to Japanese occupation in 1945 that was orchestrated by Suu Kyi’s father, the founder of the military.

Suu Kyi, Myanmar’s most popular civilian politician, remains in detention at an undisclosed location. Many other figures in her party are also being held in custody.

Injured anti-coup protestors were brought for medical treatments to hospitals across the country, including Yangon, Myanmar (pictured)

Family members arrived at hospital across the country to see their loved ones. Pictured: A woman cries over the body of a man killed in an anti-coup protest, outside a hospital in Yangon, Myanmar

The UK’s Foreign Secretary has criticised the latest killings in Myanmar. Pictured: The body of a man killed in an anti-coup protest is brought to a hospital in Latha township, Yangon

Friends and relatives mourn over the body of Kyaw Htet Aung, 17 years old, who was fatal shot Friday, in the neck by soldiers in Dala Township, Yangon

The body of 18-year-old Hein Thant, who was shot in the head, is carried away during a protest against the military coup in Mandalay, Myanmar

Family members crying over the body of policeman Chit Lin Thu, who had joined the protests against the military coup

Chit Lin Thu was shot dead by security forces during a demonstration in Yangon’s Insein township

People lay flowers at the site where policeman Chit Lin Thu, who had joined the protests against the military coup, was shot dead by security forces during a demonstration in Yangon’s Insein township

In a week that saw international pressure on the junta ramped up with new U.S. and European sanctions, Russia’s deputy defence minister Alexander Fomin attended the parade in Naypyitaw, having met senior junta leaders a day earlier.

‘Russia is a true friend,’ Min Aung Hlaing said. There were no signs of other diplomats at an event that is usually attended by scores of officials from foreign nations.

Support from Russia and China, which has also refrained from criticism, is important for the junta as they are permanent members of the United Nations Security Council and can block potential U.N. actions.

Gunshots hit the U.S. cultural centre in Yangon on Saturday, but nobody was hurt and the incident was being investigated, U.S. embassy spokesperson Aryani Manring said. The United States has led criticism of the killings of protesters.

Myanmar military Commander-in-Chief Senior General Min Aung Hlaing participates in a parade during the 76th Armed Forces Day in Naypyitaw, Myanmar, today

Members of the armed forces rode horses as part of a parade to celebrate the 76th Armed Forces Day in Naypyitaw

As people were killed by Myanmar security forces during protests today, the country’s generals celebrated Armed Forces Day (pictured)

Senior General Min Aung Hlaing reiterated a promise to hold elections after overthrowing elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Pictured: Military aircrafts fly by during the 76th Armed Forces Day in Naypyitaw

The deaths and resistance to protests today showed the military’s determination to prevent any disruptions around Armed Forces Day (pictured)

Protesters have taken to the streets almost daily since the coup that derailed Myanmar’s slow transition to democracy, despite the mounting toll.

‘The Myanmar Armed Forces Day isn’t an armed forces day, it’s more like the day they killed people,’ General Yawd Serk, chair of the Restoration Council of Shan State/Shan State Army – South, told Reuters in neighbouring Thailand.

‘If they continue to shoot at protesters and bully the people, I think all the ethnic groups would not just stand by and do nothing.’

Author and historian Thant Myint-U wrote on Twitter: ‘A failed state in Myanmar has the potential to draw in all the big powers – including the US, China, India, Russia, and Japan – in a way that could lead to a serious international crisis (as well as an even greater catastrophe in Myanmar itself)’.

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