UK hot weather forecast: Britain to bask in 18C three-day heatwave before mercury plummets

UK weather: Met Office forecast ‘dry and fine’ weekend

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In a welcome spring blast of sunshine, forecasters are predicting temperatures to rise to be between 15-18C (59-64F) for many areas tomorrow afternoon. Those temperatures will remain for most of the UK until Saturday where temperatures will be at 17C for large parts of the country, according to the latest weather maps. Temperatures will soar to their highest at 3pm tomorrow as Britons are baked in spring sunshine.

The mercury will be at its highest in the North-West and North-East of England and Glasgow and Edinburgh where forecaster Netweather is reporting a high of 18C.

For the rest of the UK, temperatures will not drop below 15C according to the forecaster due to a band of hot weather hitting the country.

Anomaly graphs from WXCharts show the temperature rising to 6-8C (42-46F) above what is usually expected at this time of year.

In further support of the high temperatures, WXCharts also show temperatures rising to 18C and potentially 20C (68F) in some areas of the country.

The forecaster has shown the mercury will continue to stay above 15C for parts of Scotland on Sunday. 

Once again, the high temperatures will remain in Scotland, the North of England and the South-West.

The east and North-East of England will see the mercury hover around 15C as the UK is hit by a mini-heatwave.

However, on Monday, the forecaster is predicting conditions plummeting with Scotland seeing the greatest drop.

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Such is the severe drop in temperatures, Scotland may see the mercury struggle to rise above 10C (50F) on Monday afternoon as the mini-heatwave departs the UK.

While not as cold as Scotland, large parts of the South of England will temperatures remain in the low teens after reaching 17C for many areas.

From 9pm, the mercury will drop to close to freezing with many areas remaining at 5C (41F) across the UK.

Due to the sudden drop in temperatures, graphs show a -4C to -2C (28-24F) fall below what is usually expected at the time of year on Monday.

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According to the BBC’s forecast from tonight into tomorrow, they reported the UK will see “clear skies”.

The forecast said: “Tonight will be chilly with clear skies for much of the UK, allowing for a touch of frost to develop.

“It will stay mostly cloudy for the far north of Scotland with the chance of a few showers.

“Tomorrow will be another fine day for most with sunshine throughout.

“The far north of Scotland will again be cloudier with the odd light shower at times.”

Looking towards the end of the month, the Met Office reported the threat of showers following the brief spell of sunshine.

They said for the period between April 27 to May 6: “A settled regime will likely be in place across much of the country at first with high pressure likely to be centred to the west or northwest of the UK.

“However, there is the threat of some rain and a few showers in the north and east, as well as the chance of some rain moving up from the south and affecting southern parts of the country later.

“Throughout this period, there is also a continued threat of rural frost and patchy fog where winds fall light.

“Temperatures are quite uncertain depending on where the area of high pressure resides, particularly in the east where temperatures are likely to struggle above average.

“Warmer days are most likely to be further inland towards the south and west.”

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